Common name:Jund Badaster
Botanical name: Pediomelum castoreum
Scientific name: Pediomelum castoreum
English name:castoreum
Arabic name:
Hindi name: breadroot
Urdu name: جند بدستر

 

C. camphoratum
C. radicatum
C. tasmanicum

Type species
Castoreum radicatum

Cooke & Massee (1887)
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Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Castoridae
Genus: Castor
Species:
C. canadensis
Castoreum is a substance collected from the glands of Canadian, European, and Siberian beavers.
Women take it to start their menstrual periods or treat painful periods.
In foods and beverages, castoreum extract is used as a flavoring agent.
People take castoreum for anxiety, restless sleep, and as a calming agent.
In manufacturing, castoreum tincture is used as a fragrance or fixative in cosmetics and soaps.

Beavers use castoreum, which comes from their castor gland (not their anal gland, although the glands really are too close for our comfort under the tail),

In September 2013, popular blogger “The Food Babe” released a video proclaiming that beavers “flavor a ton of foods at the grocery store with their little butthole!” Since then, the internet has been crowded with alarmist posts saying that beaver’s butts are used to flavor everything from soft drinks to vanilla ice cream. The culprit behind this scare is a flavorant called castoreum—but what exactly is it, and is it worth all the fuss?

In foods and beverages, castoreum extract is used as a flavoring agent.
In manufacturing, castoreum tincture is used as a fragrance or fixative in cosmetics and soaps.
How does it work?
Castoreum seems to have calming and soothing effects.

Castoreum is used primarily in fragrances these days, much like musks are used. Musk, like castoreum to beavers, is extracted from a gland near a deer’s penis,

and adds depth and warmth to a fragrance — giving it a sweet, leathery molasses evocation.

In perfume:

American Beavers at the Smithsonian National Zoo, in Washington, D.C.
In perfumery, the term castoreum refers to the resinoid extract resulting from the dried and alcohol tinctured beaver castor.
The dried beaver castor sacs are generally aged for two or more years to mellow.

In food:

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration lists castoreum extract as a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) food additive. In 1965, the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association’s GRAS program (FEMA 2261 and 2262) added castoreum extract and castoreum liquid.The annual industry consumption is very low, around 300 pounds, whereas vanillin is over 2.6 million pounds annually.
Castoreum has been traditionally used in Sweden for flavoring a variety of schnapps commonly referred to as “Bäverhojt”

Other:

Castoreum was also considered for use to contribute to the flavor and odor of cigarettes.

Medieval beekeepers used castoreum to increase honey production.