Common name: Mexican Chia, Chia
Botanical name: Salvia hispanica
Scientific name:Salvia hispanica
English name: Chia Seeds 
Farsi name:
Arabic name: بذور شيا
Hindi name:  تخم شربتی
Urdu name: چیا سیڈ

Fiber: 11 grams.
Protein: 4 grams.
Fat: 9 grams (5 of which are omega-3s).
Calcium: 18% of the RDI.
Manganese: 30% of the RDI.
Magnesium: 30% of the RDI.
Phosphorus: 27% of the RDI.
They also contain a decent amount of zinc, vitamin B3 (niacin), potassium, vitamin B1 (thiamine) and vitamin B2.

 

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Salvia
Species: S. hispanica

DESCRIPTION

The bright green foliage of this famous Central American plant, native to central and southern Mexico and GuatemalaThe seeds are a highly nutritious food source and contain high amounts of omega-3,6 and 9, and are harvested for use in health recipes and drinks, and were in fact once the third most produced staple food there, until it was condemned by the European invaders in the 1500s and was almost wiped out altogether. The leaves and stems are also popular in sandwiches, soups, salads and stews. The local name Chia comes from the Nahuatl language and means oily. Aztec warriors used Chia as a very high energy source on their conquests and in fact it is still a traditional food of both the Tarahumara and Chumash peoples of Chiuahua, in the south western part of Mexico.

 
 

What Is Chia?

Chia is an edible seed that comes from the desert plant Salvia hispanica, grown in Mexico dating back to Mayan and Aztec cultures. “Chia” means strength, and folklore has it that these cultures used the tiny black and white seeds as an energy booster. That makes sense, as chia seeds are a concentrated food containing healthy omega-3 fatty acids, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, antioxidants, and calcium.

 

Descriptinn:

The bright green foliage of this famous Central American plant, native to central and southern Mexico and GuatemalaThe seeds are a highly nutritious food source and contain high amounts of omega-3,6 and 9, and are harvested for use in health recipes and drinks, and were in fact once the third most produced staple food there, until it was condemned by the European invaders in the 1500s and was almost wiped out altogether. The leaves and stems are also popular in sandwiches, soups, salads and stews. The local name Chia comes from the Nahuatl language and means oily. Aztec warriors used Chia as a very high energy source on their conquests and in fact it is still a traditional food of both the Tarahumara and Chumash peoples of Chiuahua, in the south western part of Mexico.