What is Leukorrhea (Sailan-ur- Rahem)?

Vaginal Discharge

Normally, vaginal discharge is clear or white. It may become stretchy and slippery during ovulation, about two weeks after your menstrual period. A change in the color or amount of discharge, accompanied by other symptoms, may indicate that you have an infection.

The vagina normally contains bacteria. Bacterial growth is controlled and affected by many different factors, such as acid level (pH) and hormones. Anything that upsets this balance may increase your risk of infection or overgrowth of any of the normal bacteria or by yeast. Possible triggers include:

Reasons

  • Antibiotic use
  • Birth control pills
  • Douching
  • Diabetes
  • Pregnancy
  • Stress
  • Tight or synthetic undergarments
  • Vaginal discharge may result from infection with:

Symptoms

You may notice a change in the color, amount or odor of discharge. A white, curd-like discharge that looks like cottage cheese is a classic sign of yeast infection. Yellow, green or gray discharge is usually a sign of trichomonas or bacterial vaginosis. Bacterial vaginosis also has an unusual, fishy odor.

Itching is usually most noticeable with a yeast infection, though it may occur with any type of infection or irritation. A dry, irritated vaginal lining, which may be particularly uncomfortable or painful during intercourse, is usually a more prominent symptom of atrophic vaginitis. A new vaginal discharge accompanied by fever, abdominal pain or pain during intercourse may indicate a sexually transmitted disease, such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. However, gonorrhea and chlamydia usually don’t cause any symptoms at all.

Diagnosis

Your Physician will ask a variety of questions to help pinpoint the cause of your discharge, including questions about recent antibiotic use, whether you have a new sexual partner, menopausal symptoms, diabetes symptoms and other recent changes in your health or lifestyle.

Treatment

Infections are treated with antibiotics. Often just one dose of antibiotics by mouth is enough. Another option is to use antibiotics in vaginal cream or gel form, especially if you have significant side effects when you take antibiotics by mouth.

If you have recurrent yeast infections and recognize the symptoms, you may use over-the-counter antifungal creams without a prescription. If your symptoms do not improve, see your Physician for an exam to confirm the diagnosis and change the treatment.

Sexual partners do not have to be treated unless you are diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease, or you experience recurrent infections and no other factor is making you prone to infection. If your sexual partner experiences a new discharge or discomfort when urinating or during intercourse, he or she should be evaluated by a Physician.

Leukorrhea (Sailan-ur- Rahem)

Vaginal Discharge

Vaginal Discharge

What is Vaginal Discharge?

Normally, vaginal discharge is clear or white. It may become stretchy and slippery during ovulation, about two weeks after your menstrual period. A change in the color or amount of discharge, accompanied by other symptoms, may indicate that you have an infection.

The vagina normally contains bacteria. Bacterial growth is controlled and affected by many different factors, such as acid level (pH) and hormones. Anything that upsets this balance may increase your risk of infection or overgrowth of any of the normal bacteria or by yeast. Possible triggers include:

Antibiotic use

Birth control pills

Douching

Diabetes

Pregnancy

Stress

Tight or synthetic undergarments

Vaginal discharge may result from infection with:

Symptoms

You may notice a change in the color, amount or odor of discharge. A white, curd-like discharge that looks like cottage cheese is a classic sign of yeast infection. Yellow, green or gray discharge is usually a sign of trichomonas or bacterial vaginosis. Bacterial vaginosis also has an unusual, fishy odor.

Itching is usually most noticeable with a yeast infection, though it may occur with any type of infection or irritation. A dry, irritated vaginal lining, which may be particularly uncomfortable or painful during intercourse, is usually a more prominent symptom of atrophic vaginitis. A new vaginal discharge accompanied by fever, abdominal pain or pain during intercourse may indicate a sexually transmitted disease, such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. However, gonorrhea and chlamydia usually don’t cause any symptoms at all.

Diagnosis

Your Physician will ask a variety of questions to help pinpoint the cause of your discharge, including questions about recent antibiotic use, whether you have a new sexual partner, menopausal symptoms, diabetes symptoms and other recent changes in your health or lifestyle.

Treatment

Infections are treated with antibiotics. Often just one dose of antibiotics by mouth is enough. Another option is to use antibiotics in vaginal cream or gel form, especially if you have significant side effects when you take antibiotics by mouth.

If you have recurrent yeast infections and recognize the symptoms, you may use over-the-counter antifungal creams without a prescription. If your symptoms do not improve, see your Physician for an exam to confirm the diagnosis and change the treatment.

Sexual partners do not have to be treated unless you are diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease, or you experience recurrent infections and no other factor is making you prone to infection. If your sexual partner experiences a new discharge or discomfort when urinating or during intercourse, he or she should be evaluated by a Physician.